~vcs-imports-ii/gnu-smalltalk/master

« back to all changes in this revision

Viewing changes to doc/tutorial.texi

  • Committer: Holger Hans Peter Freyther
  • Author(s): Mathias Laurin
  • Date: 2018-03-10 06:17:42 UTC
  • Revision ID: git-v1:dfe4b5660037c4d178853ee00458a75e51a88563
Fix typos in the tutorial

2018-01-23  Mathias Laurin <Mathias.Laurin+github.com@gmail.com>

        * doc/tutorial.texi: Fix typo in tutorial.

Show diffs side-by-side

added added

removed removed

Lines of Context:
280
280
@end example
281
281
 
282
282
These examples show how to manipulate an array.  They also
283
 
show the standard way in which messages are passed arguments
284
 
ments.  In most cases, if a message takes an argument, its
 
283
show the standard way in which messages are passed arguments.
 
284
In most cases, if a message takes an argument, its
285
285
name will end with `:'.@footnote{Alert readers will remember that the math
286
286
examples of the previous chapter deviated from this.}
287
287
 
1433
1433
 
1434
1434
@example
1435
1435
Checking extend [
1436
 
    | history |
 
1436
   | history |
1437
1437
@end example
1438
1438
 
1439
1439
This is the same syntax as the last time we defined a checking account,
1448
1448
our checking history.  Our first change will be in the handling of the
1449
1449
@code{init} message:
1450
1450
@example
1451
 
       init [
1452
 
           <category: 'initialization'>
1453
 
           checksleft := 0.
1454
 
           history := Dictionary new.
1455
 
           ^ super init
1456
 
       ]
 
1451
   init [
 
1452
       <category: 'initialization'>
 
1453
       checksleft := 0.
 
1454
       history := Dictionary new.
 
1455
       ^ super init
 
1456
   ]
1457
1457
@end example
1458
1458
 
1459
1459
This provides us with a Dictionary, and hooks it to our new
1612
1612
We built our own code blocks, and handed them off for use by system
1613
1613
objects.  But there is nothing magic about invoking code
1614
1614
blocks; your own code will often need to do so.  This chapter
1615
 
will shows some examples of loop construction in
 
1615
will show some examples of loop construction in
1616
1616
Smalltalk, and then demonstrate how you invoke code blocks
1617
1617
for yourself.
1618
1618
 
1663
1663
represent steps greater than 1.  It is done much like it was
1664
1664
for our numeric loop above:
1665
1665
@example
1666
 
   i := (Interval from: 5 to: 10 by: 2)
1667
 
   i do: [:x| x printNl]
 
1666
   i := Interval from: 5 to: 10 by: 2
 
1667
   i do: [:x | x printNl]
1668
1668
@end example
1669
1669
 
1670
1670
@node Invoking code blocks
1674
1674
for scanning only checks over a certain amount.  This would
1675
1675
allow our user to find ``big'' checks, by passing in a value
1676
1676
below which we will not invoke their function.  We will
1677
 
invoke their code block with the check number as an argument
1678
 
ment; they can use our existing check: message to get the
1679
 
amount.
 
1677
invoke their code block with the check number as an argument;
 
1678
they can use our existing @code{check:} message to get the amount.
1680
1679
 
1681
1680
@example
1682
1681
   Checking extend [
1689
1688
   ]
1690
1689
@end example
1691
1690
 
1692
 
The structure of this loop is much like our printChecks message
1693
 
sage from chapter 6.  However, in this case we consider each
 
1691
The structure of this loop is much like our @code{printChecks}
 
1692
message from chapter 6.  However, in this case we consider each
1694
1693
entry, and only invoke the supplied block if the check's
1695
1694
value is greater than the specified amount.  The line:
1696
1695