~victor-lowther/ubuntu-desktop-course/ubuntu-desktop-course-beta-vlowther

« back to all changes in this revision

Viewing changes to chapter1/Lesson1_Introducing_Ubuntu.xml

  • Committer: Victor Lowther
  • Date: 2007-12-13 15:17:35 UTC
  • Revision ID: victor.lowther@gmail.com-20071213151735-h6z5zjwvzui7rzm0
more tweaks, this time with non-obvious ones explained by xml comments.

Show diffs side-by-side

added added

removed removed

Lines of Context:
27
27
                        <para>Ubuntu is a Linux-based open source operating system. The term 'open
28
28
                        source' can be defined as a set of principles and practices that promotes
29
29
                        access to the design and production of goods and knowledge. Open
30
 
                        source is generally applied to the source code of software and is
 
30
                        source is generally applied to the source code of software that is
31
31
                        available to users with relaxed or no intellectual property restrictions. 
32
 
                        This enables users to distribute, create and modify software content, 
 
32
                        This enables users to distribute, create, and modify software content, 
33
33
                        either individually to meet their specific requirement or collaboratively
34
34
                        to improve the software. Both open source and Linux have transitioned through
35
35
                        various phases to reach their present form.</para>
50
50
                        <sect1>
51
51
                        <title>Free Software Movement, Open Source and Linux</title>
52
52
                        <para>There is often confusion between open source, free software and Linux. While
53
 
                        all three are inter-linked, there are distinct differences which are made clearer
 
53
                        all three are closely related, there are distinct differences which are made clearer
54
54
                        when looking at their evolution.</para>
55
55
                        <sect2>
56
56
                                <title>The Free Software Movement</title>
58
58
                                by companies such as IBM and shared amongst users. Software was then
59
59
                                considered an enabler for the hardware, around which the business model of
60
60
                                these corporations was built. Software was provided with source code that could be
61
 
                                improved and modified; this was therefore the very early seeds of open source
 
61
                                improved and modified; this was the earliest instance of what we now call open source
62
62
                                software. However, as hardware became cheaper and profit margins eroded in the
63
63
                                1970s, manufacturers looked to software to provide additional revenue
64
64
                                streams.</para>
70
70
                                as opposed to freedom was prevalent. With the launch of the GNU project, Stallman
71
71
                                started the Free Software Movement and in October 1985, set up the Free Software
72
72
                                Foundation.</para>
73
 
                                <para>Stallman pioneered the definition and characteristics of open source
74
 
                                software and the concept of copyleft. He is the main author of several copyleft
 
73
                                <!-- stallman would rant against being the progenitor of open source (as opposed to free) software -->
 
74
                                <para>Stallman pioneered the definition and characteristics of free
 
75
                                software (including open source software) and the concept of copyleft. He is the main author of several copyleft
75
76
                                licenses, including the GNU General Public License (GPL), which is the most
76
77
                                widely used free software license.</para>
77
78
                                <tip><title><emphasis role="strong">Nice to Know:</emphasis></title>
80
81
                                <ulink url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_stallman">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_stallman</ulink></para></tip>
81
82
                                <para>By 1991, a number of GNU tools, including the powerful GNU
82
83
                                compiler collection (GCC), had been created. However, a 
83
 
                                free kernel was yet unavailable to build a free OS that would use these
 
84
                                free kernel was yet unavailable to complete the free OS that would use these
84
85
                                tools.</para>
85
86
                        </sect2>
86
87
                        <pdfpagebreak></pdfpagebreak>
113
114
                                <tip><title><emphasis role="strong">Nice to Know:</emphasis></title>
114
115
                                <para>Linux is not owned by any individual or company, not even Linus Torvalds
115
116
                                who started Linux. However, Torvalds is heavily involved in the main kernel
116
 
                                development process and owns the trademark, Linux.</para></tip>
 
117
                                development process and owns the Linux trademark.</para></tip>
117
118
                                <para>The Linux open source code:
118
119
                                        <itemizedlist>
119
120
                                                <listitem><para>Is available and accessible to everyone</para></listitem>
122
123
                                                <listitem><para>Can be freely redistributed in its current or a modified
123
124
                                                form</para></listitem>
124
125
                                        </itemizedlist>
125
 
                                </para>
126
 
                                <para>Initially, Linux was seen as (and indeed used by) a very technical, hard
 
126
        </para>
 
127
        <!-- parenthetical comment did not make sense, so deleted it. -->
 
128
        <!-- also cleaned up the rest of the language in the rest of the paragraph -->
 
129
                                <para>Initially, Linux was seen as a very technical, hard
127
130
                                core open source programming tool. Thousands of developers contributed to its
128
 
                                success as it evolved to become more user friendly commercial and non-commercial
129
 
                                distribution versions designed for everyday application use.</para>
 
131
                                success, and as it evolved it became more user friendly as commercial and non-commercial
 
132
                                distributions were designed for everyday use.</para>
130
133
                                <para>In 1998, Jon "maddog" Hall, Larry Augustin, Eric S. Raymond,
131
134
                                Bruce Perens et al formally launched the Open Source Movement. They
132
135
                                promoted open source software exclusively on the basis of technical
140
143
                                coincided, resulting in the popularity of Linux and the
141
144
                                evolution of many open source friendly companies such as Corel (Corel
142
145
                                Linux), Sun Microsystems (OpenOffice.org) and IBM (OpenAFS). In the
143
 
                                early 21st century when the dot.com crash was at its peak,
 
146
                                early 21st century when the dot.com crash was at its nadir,
144
147
                                open source was in a prime position as a viable alternative to expensive
145
148
                                proprietary software. Its momentum has strengthened since with the availability
146
 
                                of many easy to use applications.</para>
147
 
                                <para>As such, what started off as an idea became a passion to revolutionise a
 
149
                                of many easy to use and powerful applications.</para>
 
150
                                <para>As such, what started off as an idea became a passion to revolutionise and simplify a
148
151
                                patent and license intense industry. With a significantly cheaper return on investment 
149
152
                                and enhanced usability features, Linux is now rooted as viable option for
150
153
                                enterprises and home users.</para>
169
172
                                        <imagedata fileref="images/chapter1_img_04.png" format="PNG"></imagedata>
170
173
                                </imageobject></mediaobject>
171
174
                        </figure>
172
 
                        Based on the principles of time-based releases, a strong Debian foundation, the GNOME desktop, and a strong commitment 
 
175
                        Based on the principles of regular, scheduled releases, a strong Debian foundation, the GNOME desktop, and a strong commitment 
173
176
                        to freedom, this group operated initially under the auspices of http://no-name-yet.com.</para>
174
177
                        <para>In a little over three years, Ubuntu has grown to a community of over 12,000 members and an estimated user base of over 8 million
175
178
                        (as at June 2007).</para>
248
251
                                and more practical for large deployments of Ubuntu. for Desktops supported until June 2009; servers supported until June 2011.</para>
249
252
                                        </listitem>
250
253
                                        <listitem>
 
254
                                                                        <!-- support EOL was wrong -->
251
255
                                <para><emphasis role="strong">Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft)</emphasis></para>
252
256
                                <para>Ubuntu 6.10 was the fifth release of Ubuntu in October 2006. This version guarantees a robust boot process.
253
 
                                Supported until April 2007.</para>
 
257
                                Supported until April 2008.</para>
254
258
                                        </listitem>
255
259
                                        <listitem>
256
260
                                <para><emphasis role="strong">Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn)</emphasis></para>
280
284
                         Xubuntu is intended for users with less-powerful computers or those who seek a highly efficient desktop environment on faster systems.</para>
281
285
                        </sect2>
282
286
                                <sect2>
283
 
                                <title>Ubuntu Development and the Community</title>
284
 
                                <para>Ubuntu is a joint collaboration project between Ubuntu community members
285
 
                                all around the world, and in addition to this community, Canonical pays
 
287
                                                                <title>Ubuntu Development and the Community</title>
 
288
                                                                <!-- grammar cleanups -->
 
289
                                <para>Ubuntu is a collaborative project between Ubuntu community members
 
290
                                all around the world. In addition to this community, Canonical pays
286
291
                                developers to contribute to Ubuntu too. Since its inception in 2004,
287
292
                                thousands of contributors have joined the Ubuntu community. These users
288
293
                                contribute towards Ubuntu development through writing code, advocacy,
304
309
                                <para>The developer zone is comprised of developers who create and package software,
305
310
                                fix bugs and maintain Ubuntu. They are responsible for ensuring that
306
311
                                Ubuntu has a wide catalogue of software and it operates reliably and
307
 
                                smoothly. A great way to get started as a packager is to join MOTU - see
 
312
                                smoothly. A great way to get started as a packager is to join the Masters of the Universe (MOTU) - see
308
313
                                <ulink url="https://wiki.ubuntu.com/MOTU/GettingStarted"> https://wiki.ubuntu.com/MOTU/GettingStarted</ulink> for how to get started.</para>
309
314
                                <para><emphasis role="strong">Idea Pool</emphasis></para>
310
315
                                <para>If you have ideas for projects, proposals and enhancements but do not
341
346
                                </para>
342
347
                                <para><emphasis role="strong">Ubuntu Desktop Course Development</emphasis></para>
343
348
                                <para>Part of Canonical's mission (Canonical sponsors Ubuntu) is to enable the
344
 
                                widest deployment of Ubuntu on as many computers and servers, in
 
349
                                widest deployment of Ubuntu on as many computers and servers in
345
350
                                as many corners of the world as possible. Training is seen as a core
346
 
                                enabler for the adoption of Ubuntu and as such courses are designed to
 
351
                                enabler for the adoption of Ubuntu and as such training courses are designed to
347
352
                                certify Ubuntu professionals, assist partners to deploy Ubuntu and show desktop
348
353
                                users (such as yourselves) how to use and get the most out of it. For
349
354
                                more information on Ubuntu course availability and certifications, please
360
365
                                Ubuntu's philosophy and the open source tradition.</para>
361
366
                        </sect2>
362
367
                </sect1>
363
 
                <!--            <sect1>
 
368
                <!-- commented out becuase the introduction is not really the place to explain the details of package repositiries.
 
369
                <sect1>
364
370
                                <title>Software Repository and Categories</title>
365
371
                                <para>A software repository is a library of software from where you can download
366
372
                                and install packages (applications) over the Internet. The Ubuntu software